Toxics Linked to Hormone Disruption and Asthma Found In Consumer Products, says National Work Group for Safe Markets

Published In: Garden, Home, Massachusetts 
Thursday, March 8, 2012 3:57 PM
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Toxics Linked to Hormone Disruption and Asthma Found In Consumer Products, says National Work Group for Safe Markets

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Toxics Linked to Hormone Disruption and Asthma Found In Consumer Products, says National Work Group for Safe Markets
PR Newswire
BOSTON, March 8, 2012








BOSTON, March 8, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Toxic chemicals linked to rising rates of endocrine disruption related disease were found in consumer products and reported in a peer reviewed article in Environmental Health Perspectives today. Silent Spring Institute tested cleaning products, cosmetics, sunscreens, shower curtains, air fresheners, and other household goods made by Colgate, Unilever, S.C. Johnson, Johnson and Johnson, Procter & Gamble, Seventh Generation, and Ecover and others."Test results show conventional and 'green' products contain hidden toxic chemicals not on product labels; consumers have no way of avoiding them," says Alexandra Scranton from Women's Voices for the Earth, who conducted their own tests for hidden toxic chemicals in products.

Martha Arguello, with Physicians for Social Responsibility – Los Angeles, says: "Silent Spring used Battelle Labs in Ohio: they found 55 chemicals associated with endocrine disruption or asthma, including parabens, BPA, triclosan, and more. It's not good science to assume that cumulative exposure to chemicals is safe.""This study found PVC products, including a pillow protector and shower curtain, contained high levels of toxic phthalate DEHP," explains Mike Schade from Center for Health, Environment & Justice. "Phthalates, banned in toys, are widespread in many PVC products in schools and at home. Linked to asthma, impacts on brain development, and reproductive health problems in baby boys, safer cost-effective alternatives exist for our schools and homes.""Many products are targeted to women of color who suffer from high health disparities that are linked to endocrine disruptors in products. We hope studies like this inspire better policies and regulations," says Janette Robinson-Flint from Black Women for Wellness. "Mothers shouldn't have to be biochemists to protect themselves and their families."

"Many folks tested positive for BPA and Triclosan in our human biomonitoring studies," says Sharyle Patton, Director of the Biomonitoring Resource Center at Commonweal. "One has to wonder if rising rates of health problems are linked to these exposures."Caroline Cox, Research Director, Center for Environmental Health, says, "These unnecessary, untested and unlabeled chemicals in dozens of products threaten our children's and families' health. It's past time for federal action.""This is another example of the failure of federal law to protect workers and consumers," said Sarah Doll from SAFER States, "States have been acting to protect consumers from toxic chemicals."

Experts, Direct Contact info: http://www.louisvillecharter.org/SilentSpring3.08.12.shtml
SOURCE National Work Group for Safe Markets








 
Thursday, March 8, 2012 3:57 PM

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